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About NCATS

Budget

U.S. Capitol with cherry blossomsAs with all of NIH, the budget for NCATS is based on the fiscal year appropriation provided by Congress and the President. The process starts with the President’s Budget Request, which is usually released in February. The President's request typically is followed by appropriation hearings by Congress, which result in appropriation bills and reports. The final appropriation bill, if passed by Congress and signed by the President, provides NCATS with its budget for the fiscal year (October 1 through September 30).  

NCATS tracks the status of its budget and provides relevant information below. The status of all appropriation bills also is available.

Future Fiscal Year: 2015

Congressional Appropriations Hearings

NCATS Director Christopher P. Austin, M.D., shows a kidney-on-a-chip, part of the Tissue Chip for Drug Screening program, at the April 2, 2014, Senate Appropriations Subcommittee Hearing

NCATS Director Christopher P. Austin, M.D., shows a kidney-on-a-chip, part of the Tissue Chip for Drug Screening program, at the April 2, 2014, Senate Appropriations Subcommittee Hearing.

The Congressional Appropriations Subcommittees on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies usually hold hearings on the NIH budget request.

Senate Hearing: April 2, 2014

Subcommittee WebsiteArchived Webcast (attended by NCATS Director Christopher P. Austin, M.D.)

House Hearing: March 26, 2014

Subcommittee WebsiteArchived Webcast

Budget Request

The President released his fiscal year (FY) 2015 budget on Tuesday, March 4, 2014. The FY 2015 budget request for NCATS is $657.471 million, an increase of $25.075 million over the FY 2014 enacted level. Requested changes reflect funding for new initiatives; additional competing research project grants over FY 2014; Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer awards; expanded NCATS collaboration with the NIH Clinical Center; and redirected AIDS research funds to expand NIH support for research directed toward a cure for HIV.

Current Fiscal Year: 2014

Appropriation Law

On Jan. 17, 2014, Congress passed and the President signed an appropriations bill that funds NIH/NCATS through the end of the fiscal year. The law (P.L. 113-76) provides the following for NCATS:

For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the PHS Act with respect to translational sciences, $633,267,000: Provided, That up to $9,835,000 shall be available to implement section 480 of
the PHS Act, relating to the Cures Acceleration Network: Provided further, That at least $474,746,000 is provided to the Clinical and Translational Sciences Awards program.

Appropriation Report

The Conference Report accompanying P.L. 113-76 provided additional language from Congress regarding NCATS.

Congressional Bills and Reports

Senate

  • Senate Bill: S. 1284 (See page 61.)
    • The Senate’s proposed appropriation for NCATS is:

      NATIONAL CENTER FOR ADVANCING TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCES
      For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the PHS Act with respect to translational sciences, $661,264,000: Provided, That up to $50,000,000 shall be available to implement section 480 of the PHS Act, relating to the Cures Acceleration Network.
  • Senate Report 113-71 (See pages 101–102.)
    • The Senate report highlights some of NCATS' programs.

Congressional Appropriations Hearings

The Congressional Appropriations Subcommittees on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies usually hold hearings on the NIH budget request.

Senate Hearing: March 15, 2013

Subcommittee WebsiteNCATS Opening Statement

House Hearing: March 5, 2013

Subcommittee WebsiteArchived Webcast

Budget Request

The President released his FY 2014 budget on Wednesday, April 10, 2013. The FY 2014 budget request for NIH was $31.3 billion. The FY 2014 budget request for NCATS was $665.688 million, an increase of $91.391 million over the FY 2012 level. Specific increases were requested for the Cures Acceleration Network (+$40.111 million); Clinical and Translational Science Awards (+$1.108 million); the Therapeutics for Rare and Neglected Diseases program (+$3.79 million); and Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer program (+$3.4 million). Requested increases reflect the beginning of direct funding (+$31.34 million) by NCATS of the Bridging Interventional Development Gaps program, the NIH Chemical Genomics Center, the BioAssay Research Database, and the Small Molecule Repository, which were previously supported by the NIH Common Fund. In addition, there was a requested increase for Translational Research Resources (+$10.704 million) to provide for NCATS’ increased share of trans-NIH programs and initiatives that support the entire spectrum of biomedical research.

Related Links

Contacts

Dorit Zuk, Ph.D.
Director 
NCATS Office of Policy, Communications and Strategic Alliances

Steve Seidel
Acting Director of Policy